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Fearon

Assistant Professor, Physiotherapy
Faculty of Health
University of Canberra
Australia

Biography

Angie Fearon has 30 years of clinical and 10 years of research experience. She knows firsthand the difficulties of implementing changes in clinical practice. Angie regularly speaks to clinicians and provides input to consultants with respect to the assessment and management of people with complex back, pelvis and hip problems, and tendon problems.  In addition to her academic role, Angie is a visiting physiotherapist at the Australian Institute of Sport and is Clinical Assistant to Professor Paul Smith. Angie has 12 papers in international peer reviewed journals and has presented locally, nationally and internationally on hip and tendon research. 2011, PhD, Medical Science, Australian National University 2000, Masters Degree, Physiotherapy, University of South Australia 1996, Bachelor of applied science, physiotherapy, Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences. Grants 2012 Post-Doctoral Fellow, travel award $750.00 to present two papers at the International Federation of Orthopaedic and Manipulative Physiotherapists, Quebec 2012. UBC, Faculty of Medicine. 2009 Fieldwork Funding: 'Modulation of gene expression in gluteal tendinopathy'; amount awarded $1,147.23, ANU. 2003 Sponsored delegate to General Practice and Primary Health Care research conference Awards 2013 Chief Minister and Treasury Directorate Awards – Group award for innovative implementation. 2012 Best paper, "Are child bearing hips a risk factor for Greater trochanteric pain syndrome? APA, ACT Branch Research Symposium, Sept. 2012, Canberra, Australia. 2011 ACT branch award for Outstanding Service and Commitment to the Promotion of Physiotherapy Research and the ACT branch of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. 2010 ASICS Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport.  Port Douglas 4 - 6 Nov. 2010. "Wendy Ye award for best paper on women and sport." Canberra health annual research meeting (CHARM) June 2010. The ACT health research office departmental prize presented to the Trauma and orthopaedic research unit. "Highest number of submissions from a single department". 2009 Best participant: KLEOS (Smith and Nephew) "Professional development in clinical research".  Marriot Hotel, Sydney. 2008 ACT branch award for Outstanding Service and Commitment to the Promotion of Physiotherapy Research and the ACT branch of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. 2004 ACT branch award for Outstanding Service and Commitment to the Promotion of Physiotherapy Research and the ACT branch of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. 2005 Winner Most Promising Research Proposal ACT branch Australian Physiotherapy Association Annual Research Symposium, September 2005, Canberra. "A Pain in the Bum, Greater Trochanter Pain Syndrome"

Research Interest

Angie's primary teaching area is the assessment and management of musculoskeletal dysfunction, and conditions associated with ageing. This includes teaching in the early and later years for the physiotherapy course. In the later years, attention is paid to dealing with the complexities of multiple co-morbidities, often seen in our older population. This is addressed by focusing on functional assessments and outcome based treatment strategies. Areas of Research Angie's primary area of research is the assessment and management of hip pain. She has a particular interest in gluteal tendinopathy, (bursitis, lateral hip pain) and hip osteoarthritis. Her research has a strong implementation bias as she considers research should inform practice, and be implemented as soon as possible.  Angie is also interested in the science of implementation (knowledge translation). She has worked with colleagues at the University of British Columbia in this area in relation to tendon issues.

Publications

  • Fearon, A. M., Ganderton, C., Scarvell, J. M., Smith, P. N., Neeman, T., Nash, C., & Cook, J. L. (2015). Development and validation of a VISA tendinopathy questionnaire for greater trochanteric pain syndrome, the VISA-G. Man Ther, 20(6), 805-813. doi: 10.1016/j.math.2015.03.009

  • Fearon, A. M., Cook, J. L., Scarvell, J. M., Neeman, T., Cormick, W., & Smith, P. N. (2014). Greater trochanteric pain syndrome negatively affects work, physical activity and quality of life: a case control study. J Arthroplasty, 29(2), 383-386. doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2012.10.016

  • Grimaldi, A., & Fearon, A. (2015). Gluteal Tendinopathy: Integrating Pathomechanics and Clinical Features in Its Management. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 45(11), 910-922. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2015.5829

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